We are Golden

I don’t have a faith, as such. “What, no spiritual security?” you ask. Well, in the absence of an invisible friend, I take my comfort from statements like “half our bodies' atoms were formed beyond the Milky Way.”

When I was about four, my mother told me that if I wasn’t a good boy, god would know about it. He was everywhere, could see everything, knew what everyone was up to. Initially I remember feeling sorry for god. He must have found it very hard work to keep tabs on everything in this way. But a few short years later, when my father walked out on us, I decided that god had fallen down on the job. Maybe he just dozed off while the love of my mother’s life was playing away from home. Whatever his excuse, it wasn’t good enough. So there you are. Another atheist was made.

Don’t get me wrong. I’m not anti-religion. I just don’t have it in me to undertake a leap of faith. I’ve listened carefully to various cases for believing, but to take that route would, for me, be merely hedging my bets.

I’m content as I am. Happy with the idea that our lives are sparks of intense light, between two great “unknowns”. That’ll do.


Comments

  1. It’s often traumatic life events like this that make people question the existence of God. As you say, youve you’ve listened to the various cases for believing, but if the faith isn’t there, and you’re content, that’s fine.

    Thank you for reminding me of this beautiful song. It made me seek out the Joni Mitchell original - and then I was off, listening to more Joni, and wallowing in my own memories.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I inherited many Joni albums from a friend who was a big fan. I confess I haven't listened to them all. But I really like Hejira, and particularly the track, 'Amelia'.

      Delete
  2. Such an interesting post and I absolutely love that: "... lives are sparks of intense light between two great unknowns" Must remember that! No faith here either - at least certainly not in anything conventional. It seems to me that humans, being blessed with imaginations, excel at making up stories, and when you combine that with our constant need to work out the whys and wherefores of everything around us, well, it leads to the making up of the biggest stories of all, the ones that underpin religious beliefs, as a way to explain the inexplicable. But there is something marvellous about not knowing the answer to everything, and just accepting that some things are bigger and more complex than we'll ever understand, and I'm quite happy to accept that - that it's just the law of nature, of the universe, or whatever. That said, if faith gives those who have it some comfort when they need it, I can't knock it. It just seems to me - ironically - to be too 'man-made'!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I agree, C. Many things remain unexplained. But then, a little mystery makes life interesting, doesn't it?

      Delete
  3. It was no such awful event that brought me to my present status of non-believer but lots of reading of history and comparative religions. Re stardust - I hope to have for my epitaph 'Traveling Light.'

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Like you, I've read a fair bit. A big 'game changer' for me, was my introduction to various schools of philosophical thought. Oh, and 'The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying' is special.

      Delete

Post a Comment

Popular Posts